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Tuesday, June 2, 2020

Dr. Hadjiliadis, UPenn pulmonologist shares insights on COVID-19 pandemic

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Special to the Hellenic News of America

 

Denis Hadjiliadis, M.D., M.H.S., Ph.D., a pulmonologist at the Harron Lung Center Perelman at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania spoke to Hellenic News of America’s publisher, Aphrodite Kotrotsios, on the Coronavirus pandemic that is sweeping through the world.  He shared his thoughts on antivirals, the hospital setting, social distancing measures, and advice on how to stay healthy and safe. Dr. Hadjiliadis specializes in cystic fibrosis and is the program director of Adult Cystic Fibrosis at the Harron Lung Center Perelman, one of the largest programs in the country. He is also the Paul F. Harron, Jr. Associate Professor at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.  Dr. Hadjiliadis completed his undergraduate studies at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, and his M.D. at the University of Toronto, in Canada in 1995.  

Aphrodite Kotrotsios (AK): How long do you think it will take before there will be a vaccine for COVID-19 and antivirals?

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Dr. Denis Hadjiliadis (DDH): The vaccine will likely take a year or 18 months, as studies have to go from safety to efficacy (Phase 1 to Phase 3 studies) and that takes time, although these would be the best solution. There are 70 potential vaccine efforts now, which makes it likely that one or more will succeed.  Antivirals or other medications will hopefully be earlier; we expect results from some early trials in the next 4-6 weeks. However, unless we are really lucky, these will at best improve disease severity rather than cure or prevent. This is also very important because it could help avoid one of the biggest fears, which is overwhelming for all hospitals with patients.

(AK): Are you hopeful with the antivirals being developed and have you seen any clinical change in your own personal experience?

(DDH): Remdesivir, lopinavir/ritonavir, and hydroxychloroquine have had some hints of possible mild effectiveness; they also have reports that show they are not effective. We will see results soon from controlled trials that are large enough to tell us what they can offer.  I have no personal experience, as my experience is second hand (I have not been a primary caretaker of COVID patients in the hospital).

(AK): Do you currently have enough ICU beds or are you currently filled to capacity?

(DDH): First let me say, that leadership has worked very aggressively in creating capacity, finding ways to make more ICU beds, creating units specializing in COVID-19, and putting teams together. I know other health systems are doing similar things.  My hospital system has capacity at this time and assuming the mitigation efforts of social distancing continue and are effective, we expect we will be able to handle things. However, if things go uncontrolled like in Italy, Spain, or NYC, I do not think any health system can handle that.  However, all these are done, while “sacrificing” elective or non-urgent cases to keep capacity for COVID-19, which is not good in the long run

(AK): Are all the patients intubated? What percent would you say?

(DDH): Between 30-40% are intubated.

(AK): When do you feel we will start seeing a decline in infected individuals?

(DDH): In places where things peaked out of control and quickly, there is a decline of new cases every day (Italy, Spain, New York); in the next 2-3 weeks as fewer new patients get infected and more patients recover and unfortunately a few die, the active case number will decrease.  In places like Pennsylvania, where the new case numbers have not increased exponentially, it is more difficult to see the decline (although the number of new cases has now plateaued); same is true for Greece, where there was never a clear peak, because they took measures very early. For these places, we might see the same pattern.  However, to say things will be really safe, the number of active cases has to be really low. Until then, as we loosen up things there is a high risk of another spike in new cases.

(AK): What percentage do you feel are younger than 40 who are critical?

(DDH): Young patients are susceptible to infection too; in addition, some young people did not pay as much attention early on, so they might have had more infections than expected early on. The critically ill that are completely healthy young patients remains low (less than a quarter of total critically ill patients); however, even if one percent of patients less than 40 get critically ill and we have 200,000 young patients, that is 2000 patients. In addition, young patients always make the news.

(AK):  Has that situation come under control with procuring masks and medical gear?

(DDH): It is manageable in our area, but would not say things are safe; there is still the risk of shortage; by reducing the daily infections and delaying the “peak” we are buying more time to have industry produce more masks, medical, ventilators, etc.

(AK): What more do you feel the general population can do to help?

(DDH): STAY HOME; even when things open up do your best to stay home and use social distancing rules.  Before any measures were taken every patient spread the infection to about 2.5 other people; as social distancing measures came on, the rate appears to have dropped to about 1.4 or slightly less in places like Washington, leading to smaller increases and eventual decline of cases. If/when we manage to get the Ro to below 1 then the pandemic will die out; this will be difficult to do, but would be the best-case scenario.

(AK): What message do you want to communicate concerning the pandemic and COVID-19?

(DDH): This creates stress in many aspects of society and all of us; it also shows we can work together to mitigate this challenge; despite all the “bickering” among politicians, people have in general done well with distancing and the effects are being seen.

(AK): How can we overcome the challenges we are facing from this pandemic?

(DDH): Helping each other out. Taking care of the most vulnerable.  Providing emotional support to people around us who are isolated. Following recommendations from scientists based on the best available evidence. This is probably the most frustrating part, as when something is going on, you want to react, but sometimes patience is the best thing.

(AK): What have you learned as a result of this crisis, going forward?

(DDH): We need a more centrally organized response to any pandemic with coordination with local authorities to be able to deploy locally as needed.  Private entities cannot be expected to be stockpiling equipment just in case and at the same time expected to be profitable. Things have to be done in the public setting with ramp-up from the private sector as soon as the need arises.

 

The copyrights for these articles are owned by the Hellenic News of America. They may not be redistributed without the permission of the owner. The opinions expressed by our authors do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Hellenic News of America and its representatives.

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